Medical Heritage

Medical Heritage – A Southern Tradition

SMA Alliance members are encouraged to promote awareness of our medical heritage through community and state programs and projects with the goal to stimulate an interest in the research and recording of otherwise unacknowledged events and significant contributions to the broad field of medicine within the SMA region.

Symbols

Anthurium
The Symbol for Medical Heritage is the heart-shaped Anthurium flower in the original red and gold colors of the Southern Medical Association.



Aesculapius
The symbol of the medical profession is the entwined serpent and the distaff. It is the symbol of Aesculapius, god of medicine and father of two sons, both physicians. Aesculapius was also the father of three daughters, Hygeia, the goddess of health, Panacea (all-healer), and Iaso (healer). The serpent is used because in mythology the shedding of its skin each year probably meant renewal and regeneration. The knotty rod or distaff was the symbol of support for the weak and the problems of medicine.

History of Medical Heritage and SMAA

Medical Heritage is the oldest continuing project of the SMA Alliance, begun in 1930 to initially gather and publish biographical sketches of outstanding physicians for distribution to schools and libraries in the Southern Medical region.

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Project Ideas

Annual Awards

  1. Certificates and ribbons (first, second and third place) are given for each of the following catagories:
  2. State exhibits
  3. Exhibits from counties with over 150 members.
  4. Exhibits from counties of 75 to 150 members
  5. Exhibits from counties with less than 75 members
  6. The Dr. and Mrs. Milford O. Rouse Award is given for the most outstanding project, whether from a county or state.
  7. Special commendation awards may be given.

PROJECT CRITERIA

All studies and projects must:

  1. relate to events or activities within, or relative to, the region of the Southern Medical Association.
  2. be material not previously exhibited.  “Redbooks” submitted should clearly show what information is new.


State Projects:

Each state may enter one state project per year. To qualify as a state project, the project must:
1. represent three or more counties in the state, or
2.be worked on by people from several counties, or
3.be on a state-wide institution or organization, or
4.be a multi-county survey of some type of institution.
It may also qualify if it will be made available to citizens of the entire state through a museum or etc.

C
ounty Projects:
Every county in each member state is entitled to enter one project per year.  These will be judged in three size catagories based on number of county members.

If your project needs funding: Contact your state Medical Heritage Councilor.  SMA generously provides an annual financial allotment for each state, and your Councilor may be able to allot some of it to you.

PREPARING THE PROJECT FOR PRESENTATION

One or more of the following methods for presenting a project may be used.  However, winners will not be chosen for the number of methods used, but for the best project.

Methods of Presentation include:

  1. Books, Manuscripts, poems, or brochures.
  2. If not written by Auxiliary member, indicate any Auxiliary role in promoting or publicizing;
  3. Video or audio tapes, or slide presentations
  4. Scrapbooks and/or Poster displays of pictures/articles
  5. Redbooks

A Redbook is a red scrapbook that documents medical history through pictures, articles, etc. and is kept up-to-date by a state or county auxiliary/alliance and submitted periodically for judging.  Only material added since the last submission can be judged, and must be clearly marked for the judges.

Whatever method is chosen, all exhibits must fit into a 36 inch x 36 inch x 36 inch space.
Folding Exhibit Boards (1/4 ” too high, but acceptable!) are available from the SMAA office for a nominal charge (see p. 10) or you may develop your own display.

SUBMITTING YOUR PROJECT FOR JUDGING

  1.  Inform your state Councilor for Medical Heritage regarding your interest. Your Councilor can supply you with the official entry form, and advise you on deadlines, transporting your exhibit to the Annual Meeting, any state competitions, etc. Entry form are also available directly from Auxiliary headquarters (see p. 8).
  2. For a project to be judged, the official entry form with written summary must be submitted to SMA Auxiliary Headquarters by (July 1).  Each entrant will be sent a few simple follow-up steps for displaying the project at the SMAA Convention.  Only projects which have complied with the above deadlines and regulations will be eligible for awards.

HOW WILL THE PROJECTS BE JUDGED?

An Auxiliary judging committee will review all project entries prior to Convention, and then examine each project at Convention.  Judges will base their decisions on the following:
a. Thoroughness of description of project;
b. Quality of documentation and research and how well it is presented;
c. Quality of over-all planning and how well carried out;
d. Visual appeal, how understandably presented;
e. Suitability of methods of presentation chosen.

ANNUAL AWARDS

1. Certificates and ribbons (first, second and third place) are given for each of the following catagories:

a. State exhibits
b. Exhibits from counties with over 150 members.
c. Exhibits from counties of 75 to 150 members
d. Exhibits from counties with less than 75 members

2. The Dr. and Mrs. Milford O. Rouse Award is given for the most outstanding project, whether from a county or state.

3. Special commendation awards may be given.

A book will be kept at SMAA Headquarters in which the names of the award winners will be inscribed each year.

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