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Apotemnophilia Masquerading as Medical Morbidity

J. Mike Bensler, MD, Douglas S. Paauw, MD, FACP
Volume: 96 Issue: 7 July, 2003

Abstract:

We report a case of apotemnophilia, or “love of amputation,” in a man in his mid-20s. Apotemnophilia is defined as self-desired amputation driven by the patient's erotic fantasy of possessing an amputated limb and overachieving despite being handicapped. The desire of a patient with apotemnophilia for amputation is obsessive, and a history of repeated, unexplained injuries to the same segment of the body is common among these patients. Patients with apotemnophilia secretly harm themselves to necessitate amputation of an injured limb, which creates a diagnostic challenge for the health care provider because of the atypical presentation of self-inflicted medical morbidity caused by apotemnophilia.

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References:

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2. Everaerd W. A case of apotemnophilia: A handicap as sexual preference. Am J Psychother 1983; 37: 285–293.
 
3. Wise TN, Kalyanam RC. Amputee fetishism and genital mutilation: Case report and literature review. J Sex Marital Ther 2000; 26: 339–344.
 
4. Furth GM, Smith R. Apotemnophilia: Information, Questions, Answers, and Recommendations about Self-demand Amputation. Bloomington, IN, 1stBooks Library, 2000.
 
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6. Bansal R, Kalita J, Misra UK. Pattern of sensory conduction in Guillain-Barré syndrome. Electromyogr Clin Neurophysiol 2001; 41: 433–437.
 
7. Money J. Paraphilias: Phenomenology and classification. Am J Psychother 1984; 38: 164–179.

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