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Original Article

Comparison of Ilioinguinal-iliohypogastric Nerve Block Versus Spinal Anesthesia for Inguinal Herniorrhaphy

Aysun Yilmazlar, MD, Halil Bilgel, MD, Canan Donmez, MD, Ayla Guney, MD, Tuncay Yilmazlar, MD, Oğuz Tokat, MD
Volume: 99 Issue: 1 January, 2006

Abstract:

Objective:This study was carried out to determine the optimal anesthetic technique for use in elective herniorrhaphy. Methods:We retrospectively analyzed 126 inguinal hernia repairs. The patients were allocated to one of two groups: an ilioinguinal-iliohypogastric nerve block group (IHNB group, n = 63) and spinal anesthesia group (SA group, n = 63). We recorded information about perioperative and postoperative parameters. Results:There were statistically significant decreases in both mean arterial pressure and pulse rate in the SA group (P < 0.001). None of the patients in the IHNB group required recovery room care. Patients in the IHNB group initiated oral intake (0.31 ± 0.1 h) more quickly than patients in the SA group (5.74 ± 0.1 h) (P < 0.001). The time-to-home readiness was significantly lower (14.1 ± 1.5h) in group IHNB, compared with group SA (42.8 ± 5.3h) (P < 0.001). First rescue analgesic time postoperatively was 3.30 ± 0.2 hours in group SA and 2.7 ± 0.13 hours in group IHNB (P < 0.05). Conclusion:The use of IHNB for patients undergoing herniorrhaphy resulted in a shorter time-to-home readiness, quicker oral intake post surgery, and no need for recovery room care, when compared with the use of SA.

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