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Intranasal Corticosteroids for the Treatment of Perennial Allergic Rhinitis

Jeff Stokes, MD, FAAAAI, FACAAI
Volume: 100 Issue: 7 July, 2007

Abstract:

Allergic rhinitis is a one of the most common chronic diseases, affecting 10 to 30% of adults and up to 40% of children.1 Allergic rhinitis is typically categorized based on the timing of the rhinitis symptoms as either seasonal or perennial. One problem with this description is that certain allergens that are seasonal in some areas may be perennial in others. The recent ARIA (Allergic Rhinitis and its Impact on Asthma) guidelines reclassified allergic rhinitis based on a patient’s symptom frequency (intermittent and persistent) and severity (mild and moderate/severe).2

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References:

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11. Holm AF, Fokkens WJ, Godthelp T, et al. A 1-year placebo-controlled study of intranasal fluticasone propionate aqueous nasal spray in patients with perennial allergic rhinitis: a safety and biopsy study. Clin Otolaryngol Allied Sci 1998;23:69–73.
 
12. Skoner DP, Rachelefsky GS, Meltzer EO, et al. Detection of growth suppression in children during treatment with intranasal beclomethasone dipropionate. Pediatrics 2000;105:E23.
 
13. Schenkel EJ, Skoner DP, Bronsky EA, et al. Absence of growth retardation in children with perennial allergic rhinitis after one year of treatment with mometasone furoate aqueous nasal spray. Pediatrics 2000;105:E22.
 
14. Ober S, Gentile D, Kairis E, et al. Growth velocity and HPA axis function during 1-year treatment with triamcinolone acetonide aqueous (TAA) nasal spray in children with allergic rhinitis. J Allergy Clin Immunol 2005;115:S267.
 
15. Allen DB, Meltzer EO, Lemanske RF Jr, et al. No growth suppression in children treated with the maximum recommended dose of fluticasone propionate aqueous nasal spray for one year. Allergy Asthma Proc 2002;23:407–413.
 
16. Moller C, Ahlstrom H, Henricson KA, et al. Safety of nasal budesonide in the long-term treatment of children with perennial rhinitis. Clin Exp Allergy 2003;33:816–822.
 
17. Joint Task Force on Practice Parameters. Allergen immunotherapy: a practice parameter. American Academy of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology. American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology. Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2003;90:1–40.
 
18. Chervinsky P, Casale T, Townley R, et al. Omalizumab, an anti-IgE antibody, in the treatment of adults and adolescents with perennial allergic rhinitis. Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2003;91:160–167.

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