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Introduction

Andrew J. Weaver, PHD, Christopher G. Ellison, PHD
Volume: 97 Issue: 12 December, 2004

Abstract:

Compassionate patient care should be an integral part of the medical profession. Unfortunately, while medicine is making tremendous technologic advances, the potential for offering compassionate care is decreasing. Patients and their families may be intimidated by the health care delivery system and modern technology-based treatment.1The current health care system consists largely of fragmented, specialized care for specific problems rather than a holistic approach to treatment. Economic pressures are also affecting all health care professionals and decreasing the time they can spend with patients. Physicians and other medical professionals face new demands and are under increasing stress.

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19. Hummer RA, Ellison CG, Rogers RG, et al. Religions involvement and adult mortality in the United States: review and perspective. South Med J 2004;97:1223–1230.
 
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