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Patients’ Satisfaction With Dermatology Residents

Monica Huynh, BA, Andrew D. Lee, MD, Lee M. Miller, MD, Scott Davis, MA, Steven R. Feldman, MD, PhD, Amy McMichael, MD
Volume: 105 Issue: 10 October, 2012

Abstract:

Objectives: Patients’ perception of quality is a critical primary outcome of medical care. Important downstream effects of perceived quality include a more trusting attitude toward the physician, more adherence to treatment, and better treatment outcomes. Patients’ satisfaction issues are important to address during dermatology residency training. The aim of the study was to determine patients’ satisfaction with dermatology residents and identify potential areas that could be targeted to improve satisfaction.


Methods: Dermatology residents informed patients about a survey on an online doctor rating/patients’ satisfaction Web site (www.DrScore.com), provided the patients with cards with the Web site address, and requested that they complete the survey. Respondents provided an overall rating, open comments, and detailed information in seven core areas. The numerical ratings were on a scale from 0 (not at all satisfied) to 10 (extremely satisfied). Patients had the option of indicating aspects of care that could be improved. Descriptive statistics are reported.


Results: A total of 148 surveys were collected with a mean rating for the six residents of 9.7 out of 10, with a range of 9.4 to 10. The average during the early period was 9.7 out of 10, whereas the average during the late period was 9.8 out of 10. Fifty-two surveys (35%) indicated areas for improvement, with the most common issues related to staff, parking availability, waiting time, waiting area, and ability to obtain information.


Conclusions: Patients were generally satisfied with the care provided by dermatology residents. Areas for improvement were identified, but these were largely areas over which residents do not have direct control.

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