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Original Article

The Impact of Bronchiectasis in Clinical Presentation of Asthma

I. Kivilcim Oguzulgen, MD, Firdevs Kervan, MD, Turkan Ozis, MD, Haluk Turktas, MD
Volume: 100 Issue: 5 May, 2007

Abstract:

Background: Though asthma and bronchiectasis are two different diseases, their coexistence has been shown in many patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical features of asthmatics with bronchiectasis compared with pure asthmatics.


Methods: We evaluated 1680 asthmatics followed-up in our clinic. Fifty-one asthmatics had the diagnosis of bronchiectasis. These patients were compared with fifty-one age and gender matched asthmatics without bronchiectasis.


Results: The prevalence of bronchiectasis among the asthmatics was 3%. Asthma diagnosis was made at the age of 33.2 ± 16.8 years for asthmatics with bronchiectasis and 39.5 ± 16.2 years for pure asthmatics (P = 0.05). Asthmatics with bronchiectasis mostly had severe persistent asthma (49.0%), while pure asthmatics mostly had mild persistent and intermittent asthma (69.4%). History of hospitalization due to severe asthma exacerbation and presence of chronic respiratory failure was significantly higher in bronchiectatic group.


Conclusions: These data show that bronchiectasis can contribute to severe and difficult to control asthma with pulmonary complications like chronic respiratory failure.


Key Points


* Bronchiectasis can contribute to severe and difficult to control asthma.


* Asthmatic patients with bronchiectasis have a higher risk for severe asthma attack leading to hospitalization.


* Bronchiectasis can contribute to severe pulmonary complications in asthmatics like chronic respiratory failure.


* It is important to recognize bronchiectasis in asthmatics and treat them accordingly.

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CME:

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