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Trends in Pharmacy Compounding for Women's Health in North Carolina: Focus on Vulvodynia

Susan H. Corbett, PharmD, Gary Cuddeback, PhD, MPH, Jasmine Lewis, BS, Swasan As-Sanie, MD, Denniz Zolnoun, MD, MPH
Volume: 107 Issue: 7 July, 2014

Abstract:

Objectives: To identify trends in compounding pharmacies with a focus on women’s health and, more specifically, the types and combinations of medications used in the treatment of vulvodynia.

Methods: This survey study was conducted with 653 nonchain pharmacies that compound medications. Each pharmacy was asked to complete a 19-item online survey assessing general practice and common compounding indications, focusing on women’s health.

Results: Of the 653 pharmacies contacted, 200 (31%) responded to our survey. Women’s health issues ranked third (19%) among the common indications for compounding, preceded by otolaryngology (30%) and dermatology (28%). Of the medications compounded for women’s health, the most common indication was bioidentical hormone therapy (73%) followed closely by vaginal dryness (70%) and low libido (65%). Vulvodynia, or vulvar pain, was the fourth most common indication for compounding medication for women’s health issues (29%). Vulvovaginal infections were reported as an indication for compounding medications by 16% of respondents.

Conclusions: Vulvovaginal symptoms are a common indication for compounding medications in women’s health. Further research in understanding the rationale for using compounded medications, even when standard treatments are available for some of these symptoms (eg, vaginal dryness, vulvovaginal infections), is warranted.

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CME:

Portions of this issue may be available for CME credit. Please email education@sma.org for a complete listing of current Southern Medical Journal activities, as well as other SMA educational offerings.

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