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Use of Medical Simulation to Teach Bioterrorism Preparedness: The Anthrax Example

Martin E. Olsen, MD
Volume: 106 Issue: 1 January, 2013

Abstract:

The 2001 anthrax bioterrorism attacks demonstrated vulnerability for future similar attacks. This article describes mechanisms that can be used to prepare the medical community and healthcare facilities for the diagnosis and management of a subsequent bioterrorism attack should such an event occur and the fundamentals of medical simulation and its use in teaching learners about the diagnosis of management of anthrax exposure.

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