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Comparison of Florida Skin Cancer Screening Rates With Those in Different US Regions

Cristina A. Fernandez, MSEd, Laura A. McClure, MSPH, William G. LeBlanc, PhD, Tainya C. Clarke, MPH, MS, Robert S. Kirsner, MD, PhD, Lora E. Fleming, MD, PhD, Kristopher L. Arheart, EdD, David J. Lee, PhD
Volume: 105 Issue: 10 October, 2012

Abstract:

Objectives: Florida has the second highest incidence of melanoma in the United States, and more than 600 Floridians die from melanoma annually. Given the lack of population-based data on skin cancer screening among the different US geographic regions, we compared skin cancer screening rates among Floridians to those in the rest of the South, the Northeast, the Midwest, and the West.


Methods: We used data from the 2000 and 2005 National Health Interview Survey. Data were grouped according to whether participants reported ever receiving a skin cancer examination in their lifetime. Data were pooled, and analyses accounted for sample weights and design effects. Multivariable logistic regression analyses were performed with self-reported skin screening as the outcome of interest.


Results: Results showed that compared to the rest of the US, Floridians who were women 70 years old and older, reported being of “other” race, of non-Hispanic ethnicity, having a high school education, having health insurance, and employed in the service industry or unemployed, had significantly higher lifetime skin cancer screening rates than their subgroup counterparts residing in the other regions. Multivariable logistic regression showed that Floridians remained significantly more likely to have ever been screened for skin cancer compared to the other US regions after controlling for a variety of sociodemographic variables.


Conclusions: Increasing melanoma detection remains a national cancer goal for the US, and future identification of underlying causal factors for higher screening rates in Florida could inform intervention strategies in the other US regions.

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