For the integrated multidisciplinary approach to patient care

Return to the Southern Medical Journal

Current User S2 Access Level: -1 ()
CAN NOT ACCESS LEVEL 2
Original Article

Does Gun Accessibility Lead to Violence-Related Injury?

La Vonne A. Downey ,PhD, Leslie S. Zun, MD, MBA, Trena Burke, MPA, Tangula Jefferson, MPA
Volume: 106 Issue: 2 February, 2013

Abstract:

Objectives: Because of high rates of violent gun-related injuries seen in emergency department (EDs), the ED has become involved in prevention violence intervention. The purpose of the study was to determine the relation between access to guns and the risk of violence-related injuries in youth and young adults.


Methods: This study was a convenience sample in an inner-city level I trauma center. A 28-item validated questionnaire consisting of a short questionnaire about guns, the New York City Youth Violence Survey, and the SAGE Baseline Survey was given to 201 subjects. Half of the subjects were victims of violence and half were seen for nonviolence-related problems.


Results: Subjects with violence-related injuries did not have a higher rate of accessibility to guns. They did, however, show a difference in their attitudes toward guns. The subjects who came into the ED with violence-related injuries believed that having a weapon was a way to avoid a fight (F = 4.68, P = 0.032). They were more likely to have grabbed or shoved someone in the last 6 months (F = 5.18, P = 0.025), punched someone in the last 6 months (F = 11.9, P = 0.011), and have been seen in the ED within the last 6 months for a injury related to being punched, attacked, or shot (F = 117, P = 0.00), as compared to those with nonviolence-related injuries.


Conclusions: There was no difference between the two subject groups in terms of their being victims of violence and the rate of gun accessibility. There was, however, a difference in their attitudes toward guns.

Article:

This content is limited to qualifying members. Please click on an option below to view in full. Click here to compare all member plans.

Login

Silver/Gold members login for full access. Other members login to view purchase options.

Create a New Account

Create a new complimentary account/login to view purchase options.

Images:

This content is limited to qualifying members. Please click on an option below to view in full. Click here to compare all member plans.

Login

Silver/Gold members login for full access. Other members login to view purchase options.

Create a New Account

Create a new complimentary account/login to view purchase options.

References:

1. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Injury Prevention and Control. Web-based Injury Statistics Query and Reporting System (WISQARS) 2005. http://www.cdc.gov/ncipc/wisqars. Accessed March 10, 2012.
 
2. Anderson RN. Deaths: leading causes for 2000. Natl Vital Stats Rep 2002; 50: 1–85.
 
3. Zimring FE, Hawkins G. Crime Is Not the Problem. New York: Oxford University Press, 1997: 125–131.
 
4. Brewer ND, Simon TR, Krug EG, et al. Recent trends in violence-related behaviors among high school students in the United States. JAMA 1999; 282: 440–446.
 
5. Calhoun D, Dodge CA, Journel C, et al. The supply and demand for guns to juveniles: Oakland’s gun tracing project. J Urban Health 2005; 82: 552–559.
 
6. Zun LS, Downey L. Validation of a short gun questionnaire for use in emergency medicine. South Med J 2003; 96: 1238–1242.
 
7. Zun LS, Downey L, Rosen J. Psychological assessment of young persons who are victims of violence. J Appl Res 2002; 2: 20–25.
 
8. Wilkinson D, Fagan J. What we know about gun use among adolescents. Clin Child Fam Psychol Rev 2001; 4: 109–132.
 
9. Vittes K, Sorenson S, Gilbert D. High school students’ attitudes about firearms policies. J Adolesc Health 2003; 33: 471–478.
 
10. Flewelling R, Paschall C, Ringwalt M. Aggressive behavior—SAGE Baseline Survey, in Dahlberg LL, Toal SB, Behrens CB (eds): Measuring Violence-Related Attitudes, Beliefs, and Behaviors Among Youths: A Compendium of Assessment Tools. Atlanta: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1998.
 
11. Snider C, Lee JS. Emergency department dispositions among 4100 youth injured by violence: a population-based study. CJEM 2007; 9: 164–169.
 
12. Becker M, Hall J, Ursic C, et al. Caught in the crossfire: the effects of peer-based intervention program for violently injured youth. J Adolesc Health 2004; 34: 177–183.
 
13. Youth Alive. Caught in the crossfire. http://www.youthalive.org/caught-in-the-crossfire. Accessed June 1, 2012.
 
14. Cunningham RM, Walton MA, Goldstein A, et al. Three-month follow-up of brief computerized and therapist interventions for alcohol and violence among teens. Acad Emerg Med 2009; 16: 1193–1207.
 
15. Cooper C, Eslinger DM, Stolley PD. Hospital-based violence intervention programs work. J Trauma 2006; 61: 534–540.
 
16. Division of Adolescent and School (9 DASH) and CDC. Beliefs about conflict—NYC Youth Violence Survey, in Dahlberg LL, Toal SB, Behrens CB (eds): Measuring Violence-Related Attitudes, Beliefs, and Behaviors Among Youths: A Compendium of Assessment Tools. Atlanta: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1998.

CME:

Portions of this issue may be available for CME credit. Please email education@sma.org for a complete listing of current Southern Medical Journal activities, as well as other SMA educational offerings.

This content is limited to qualifying members. Please click on an option below to view in full. Click here to compare all member plans.

Login

Silver/Gold members login for full access. Other members login to view purchase options.

Create a New Account

Create a new complimentary account/login to view purchase options.

This content is limited to qualifying members. Please click on an option below to view in full. Click here to compare all member plans.

Login

Silver/Gold members login for full access. Other members login to view purchase options.

Create a New Account

Create a new complimentary account/login to view purchase options.

Permissions