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Metastatic Staphylococcus aureus Bloodstream Infections: Don't Dare Not to Show Respect

Ioannis G. Baraboutis, MD
Volume: 104 Issue: 5 May, 2011

Abstract:

Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) is a major bacterial pathogen in all healthcare settings and the community. From 2003-2004, approximately 29% (78.9 million persons) and 1.5% (4.1 million persons) of the US population were colonized in the nose with S. aureus and methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) respectively.1 It is the most frequently occurring bacterial pathogen among clinical isolates from hospital inpatients in the United States and the second most prevalent bacterial pathogen among clinical isolates from outpatients.2,3

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References:

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2. Hidron AI, Edwards JR, Patel J, et al; National Healthcare Safety Network Team; Participating National Healthcare Safety Network Facilities. NHSN annual update: antimicrobial-resistant pathogens associated with healthcare-associated infections: annual summary of data reported to the National Healthcare Safety Network at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2006-2007. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2008;29:996-1011.
 
3. Styers D, Sheehan DJ, Hogan P, et al. Laboratory-based surveillance of current antimicrobial resistance patterns and trends among Staphylococcus aureus: 2005 status in the United States. Ann Clin Microbiol Antimicrob 2006;5:2.
 
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8. Fowler VG Jr, Olsen MK, Corey GR, et al. Clinical identifiers of complicated Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia. Arch Intern Med 2003;163:2066-2072.
 
9. del Rio A, Cervera C, Moreno A, et al. Patients at risk of complications of Staphylococcus aureusbloodstream infection. Clin Infect Dis 2009;48(4 suppl):S246-S253.
 
10. Dutta A. Metastatic methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus infection. South Med J 2011;104:355-357.
 
11. Siegman-Igra Y, Fourer B, Orni-Wasserlauf R, et al. Reappraisal of community-acquired bacteremia: a proposal of a new classification for the spectrum of acquisition of bacteremia. Clin Infect Dis 2002;34:1431-1439.
 
12. Willcox PA, Rayner BL, Whitelaw DA. Community-acquired Staphylococcus aureus bacteraemia in patients who do not abuse intravenous drugs. QJM 1998;91:41-47.
 
13. Kaech C, Elzi L, Sendi P, et al. Course and outcome of Staphylococcus aureus bacteraemia: a retrospective analysis of 308 episodes in a Swiss tertiary-care centre. Clin Microbiol Infect 2006;12:345-352.
 
14. Fridkin SK, Hageman JC, Morrison M, et al. Active Bacterial Core Surveillance Program of the Emerging Infections Program Network. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus disease in three communities [published correction appears in N Engl J Med 2005;352:2362]. N Engl J Med 2005;352:1436-1444.
 
15. King MD, Humphrey BJ, Wang YF, et al. Emergence of community-acquired methicillin-resistantStaphylococcus aureus USA 300 clone as the predominant cause of skin and soft tissue infections. Ann Intern Med 2006;144:309-317.
 
16. Larsen A, Stegger M, Goering R, et al. Emergence and dissemination of the methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus USA300 clone in Denmark (2000-2005). Euro Surveill 2007;12:22-24.

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