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Occurrence of Vitamin D Deficiency in Pediatric Patients at High Risk in West Virginia

Christy Robinson, MD, Myra Chiang, MD, Stephanie N. Thompson, PhD, Stephen B. Sondike, MD
Volume: 105 Issue: 10 October, 2012

Abstract:

Objectives: Vitamin D deficiency is prevalent and is increasingly associated with the development of medical conditions both related and unrelated to bone metabolism. The purpose of this study was to examine vitamin D deficiency in patients of a pediatrics subspecialty practice.


Methods: The study consisted of a retrospective chart review of patients aged 2 to 18 years who were referred to the West Virginia University Physicians of Charleston pediatrics subspecialty group with a diagnosis of obesity, chronic kidney disease, diabetes, hypertension, or cystic fibrosis. All of the patients had 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels measured from 2007–2009. Seventy-six patients met inclusion criteria.


Results: A total of 23.7% of patients were vitamin D deficient (≤ 20 ng/mL). Children with vitamin D deficiency were older and had higher rates of obesity than those with nondeficient vitamin D levels. The comorbidities of cystic fibrosis, diabetes, hypertension, and chronic kidney disease did not associate with vitamin D deficiency.


Conclusions: Vitamin D deficiency is common in children in West Virginia and is associated with increasing age and obesity. Vitamin D screening and supplementation should be considered in all children with chronic illness, particularly those who are overweight.

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