For the integrated multidisciplinary approach to patient care

Return to the Southern Medical Journal

Current User S2 Access Level: -1 ()
CAN NOT ACCESS LEVEL 2

Vibrio vulnificus Infection: Epidemiology, Clinical Presentations, and Prevention

Amal K. Mitra, MD, MPH, DRPH
Volume: 97 Issue: 2 February, 2004

Abstract:

V ibrio vulnificus accounts for approximately 95% of all deaths associated with seafood consumption in the United States. The organism was first reported as a cause of human illness in 1979. 1 It is ubiquitous in marine bacterial flora along the Gulf of Mexico and the Atlantic and Pacific coasts. 2 Infections due to V. vulnificus are seasonal; over 85% occur between May and October. The organism is almost undetectable from December through March in samples collected from Apalachicola Bay, FL, where most of Florida’s oyster production is based. Environmental factors, such as warm temperature (>68°F) and moderate salinity (<16 parts per thousand), favor the growth of V. vulnificus3

Article:

This content is limited to qualifying members. Please click on an option below to view in full. Click here to compare all member plans.

Login

Silver/Gold members login for full access. Other members login to view purchase options.

Create a New Account

Create a new complimentary account/login to view purchase options.

Images:

This content is limited to qualifying members. Please click on an option below to view in full. Click here to compare all member plans.

Login

Silver/Gold members login for full access. Other members login to view purchase options.

Create a New Account

Create a new complimentary account/login to view purchase options.

References:

1. Blake PA, Merson MH, Weaver RE, et al. Disease caused by a marine Vibrio: Clinical characteristics and epidemiology. N Engl J Med 1979; 300: 1–5.
 
2. Oliver JD, Warner RA, Cleland DR. Distribution and ecology of Vibrio vulnificus and other lactose-fermenting marine vibrios in coastal waters of the southeastern United States. Appl Environ Microbiol 1982; 44: 1404–1414.
 
3. Kelly MT. Effect of temperature and salinity on Vibrio (Beneckea) vulnificus occurrence in a Gulf Coast environment. Appl Environ Microbiol 1982; 44: 820–824.
 
4. Tacket CO, Brenner F, Blake PA. Clinical features and an epidemiological study of Vibrio vulnificusinfections. J Infect Dis 1984; 149: 558–561.
 
5. Johnson RW, Arnett FC. A fatal case of Vibrio vulnificus presenting as septic arthritis. Arch Intern Med 2001; 161: 2616–2618.
 
6. Ulusarac O, Carter E. South Med J 2003; 96: 168–173.
 
7. U.S. Food and Drug Administration, Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition Prime Connection.Vibrio vulnificus. Available at: http://vm.cfsan.fda.gov/|P5ear/FLVIBV.html. Accessed July 7, 2003.
 
8. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Division of Bacterial and Mycotic Diseases. Vibrio vulnificus. Available at: http://www.cdc.gov/ncidod/dbmd/diseaseinfo/vibriovulnificus_t.htm. Accessed July 7, 2003.
 
9. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Vibrio vulnificus infections associated with eating raw oysters: Los Angeles, 1996. Morb Mortal Wkly Rep 1996; 45: 621–624.
 

CME:

Portions of this issue may be available for CME credit. Please email education@sma.org for a complete listing of current Southern Medical Journal activities, as well as other SMA educational offerings.

This content is limited to qualifying members. Please click on an option below to view in full. Click here to compare all member plans.

Login

Silver/Gold members login for full access. Other members login to view purchase options.

Create a New Account

Create a new complimentary account/login to view purchase options.

This content is limited to qualifying members. Please click on an option below to view in full. Click here to compare all member plans.

Login

Silver/Gold members login for full access. Other members login to view purchase options.

Create a New Account

Create a new complimentary account/login to view purchase options.

Permissions