Editorial

Anaphylaxis: My “Top 10” List

Authors: Richard D. deShazo, MD

Abstract

Sooner or later, one of your patients is likely to experience a serious allergic reaction to a drug, food or insect. This frequently occurs when you least expect it. The article by Yong et al1 in this month’s Southern Medical Journal reminds us that the multisystem clinical features of anaphylaxis may confuse even the most astute clinician and may have severe consequences.

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References

1. Yong PF, Birns J, Ibrahim MA. Anaphylactic shock: the great mimic. South Med J 2007;100:295–297.
 
2. Sampson HA, Muñoz-Furlong A, Campbell RL, et al. Second symposium on the definition and management of anaphylaxis: summary report–Second National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Disease/Food Allergy and Anaphylaxis Network symposium. J Allergy Clin Immunol 2006;117:391–397.
 
3. Pumphrey R. Anaphylaxis: can we tell who is at risk of a fatal reaction? Curr Opin Allergy Clin Immunol 2004;4:285–290.
 
4. Lieberman P. Use of epinephrine in the treatment of anaphylaxis. Curr Opin Allergy Clin Immunol 2003;3:313–318.
 
5. Simons FE, Gu X, Simons KJ. Epinephrine absorption in adults: intramuscular versus subcutaneous injection. J Allergy Clin Immunol 2001;108:871–873.
 
6. Lieberman P. Biphasic anaphylactic reactions. Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2005;95:217–226.
 
7. Joint Task Force on Practice Parameters; American Academy of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology; American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology; Joint Council of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology. The diagnosis and management of anaphylaxis: an updated practice parameter. J Allergy Clin Immunol 2005;115:S483–S523.
 
8. Thomas M, Crawford I. Best evidence topic report. Glucagon infusion in refractory anaphylactic shock in patients on beta-blockers. Emerg Med J 2005;22:272–273.
 
9. Brown SG, Blackman KE, Stenlake V, et al. Insect sting anaphylaxis; prospective evaluation of treatment with intravenous adrenaline and volume resuscitation. Emerg Med J 2004;21:149–154.