Letter to the Editor

Pyomyositis of the Iliacus Muscle in an Adolescent

Authors: David Zlotkin, MD

Abstract

A ten-year-old female presented to the Emergency Room with the acute onset of left hip pain and was non-ambulatory when she was admitted to the hospital. On initial examination, she was in severe pain. She was afebrile with stable vital signs. The hip appeared normal, with no erythema or swelling, although it was very tender to palpation. She denied pain in other regions. The remainder of her physical exam and her past medical history were non-contributory. Initial laboratory findings showed a normal complete blood count with differential (CBCD), complete metabolic panel (CMP), and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR). Plain films of her hip, femur and pelvis were negative, as was an ultrasound of her left hip.

This content is limited to qualifying members.

Existing members, please login first.

If you have an existing account please login now to access this article or view your purchase options.

Purchase only this article ($15)

Create a free account, then purchase this article to download or access it online for 24 hours.

Purchase an SMJ online subscription ($75)

Create a free account, then purchase a subscription to get complete access to all articles for a full year.

Purchase a membership plan (fees vary)

Premium members can access all articles plus recieve many more benefits. View all membership plans and benefit packages.

References

1.Gibson RK, Rosenthal SJ, Lukert BP. Pyomyositis, increasing recognition in temperate climates.AmerJ Med 1984;77:768–772.
 
2.Bickles J, Ben-Sira L, Kessler A. Current Concepts Review: Primary Pyomyositis. J Bone Joint Surg (Am) 2002;84A:2277–2286.
 
3.Adesunkanmi AR, Akinkuolie AA, Badru OS. A five year analysis of death in accident and emergency room of a semi-urban hospital. West Afr J Med 2002;21:99–104.
 
4.Peckett W, Butler-Manuel A, Apthorp A Pyomyositis of the iliacus muscle in a child. J Bone Joint Surg Br 2001;83B:103–105.
 
5.Waagner DC. Musculoskeletal infections. In Adolescents. Adolescent Medicine: State of the Art Reviews; 11 (2), June 2000.