Improving Medical Students’ Perceptions of Older Adults by Engaging Older Military Veterans in Recreational Activities

To the Editor: The aging of the US population has led to a shortage of physicians in geriatrics to care for the 30% of older adults who should be seen by a geriatrician.1 To compound this deficit, few physicians are choosing to specialize in this...

Public CPR and AED Knowledge: An Opportunity for Educational Outreach in South Carolina

Objectives: Sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) remains a significant cause of morbidity and mortality, and the key to increased survival is emergent bystander intervention. A growing body of evidence has shown that timely bystander-initiated cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and defibrillation are significantly correlated with an increased likelihood of survival. Despite these demonstrated benefits, bystanders perform these interventions in less than...

Resident Perceptions of Competency and Comfort Before and After Telemedicine-ICU Implementation

Objectives: The purpose of this study was to examine the impact telemedicine in the intensive care unit (ICU) has on the competency, satisfaction, and education of resident physicians. Methods: Telemedicine in the ICU was implemented in 2014 at a community hospital with 24 family medicine residents. Comfort with the performance of various common procedures; management of major medical diseases in the ICU; and level of comfort, attitudes, and...

Commentary on “Resident Perceptions of Competency and Comfort Before and After Telemedicine-ICU Implementation”

Telemedicine in the intensive care unit (ICU) was first described by Grundy and colleagues in the 1980s.1 Using two-way audiovisual technology, centers that house practitioners (intensivists, advance practice providers, and critical care nurses) are connected to hospitals serving critically ill...

On “Improving Medical Students’ Perceptions of Older Adults by Engaging Older Military Veterans in Recreational Activities”

To the Editor: I would like to commend Mr Jue and his medical student colleagues at the University of Miami School of Medicine, who, along with their faculty mentor, Dr van Zullen, have addressed the important issue of medical student comfort with older adult patients....

And Now, Please Sign on the Dotted Line: Teaching Residents About Professional Life After Residency

Objectives: Despite possible long-term repercussions, few training programs teach their residents about the business of medicine. In particular, certain contractual issues can adversely affect a young physician’s career mobility. Methods: We designed a business-of-medicine curriculum and used a survey to determine whether the curriculum satisfied attendees’ perceived knowledge gaps about the topics covered in the course, which included...

Commentary on “At the Vatican, Physicians Debate Euthanasia and Assisted Suicide”

We are pleased to publish in this issue of the Southern Medical Journal an editorial by Dr Ramin W. Parsa-Parsi of Germany regarding a conference in Europe on the topics of euthanasia and assisted suicide.1 This conference was held at the Vatican under the auspices of the World Medical Association (WMA) and other institutions, and although focused on medical practices in Europe, the discussions have clear global...

Assessing Mentorship Experiences of Faculty at a Military Academic Center: Challenge and Opportunity

Objectives: Mentor relationships are a key component of professional development within academic medicine. To date, there are no investigations into the prevalence and effects of mentor relationships within military academic medicine. This quality improvement initiative aimed to establish the prevalence and effects of mentorship, including whether sex differences exist among faculty at a military academic center, the San Antonio Uniformed...

Commentary on “And Now, Please Sign on the Dotted Line: Teaching Residents About Professional Life After Residency”

When is a resident’s training complete? When her test scores prove she has retained a set of medical knowledge? When she attains behavioral milestones in communication skills, interprofessional teamwork, and quality improvement? When she embraces diversity, listens for unspoken pain, and satisfies the standards set by Hippocrates and HIPPA (Health Insurance Portability and Accountability...

Teaching Medical Educators How to Teach Communication Skills: More than a Decade of Experience

Objectives: Although opportunities exist for medical educators to gain additional training in teaching, literature that describes how to teach educators to teach communication skills to trainees is limited. The authors developed and evaluated a faculty development course that uses didactics, demonstration, drills, and role-play in a small-group format. Methods: The course has been offered through the Institute for Clinical Research Education...

At the Vatican, Physicians Debate Euthanasia and Assisted Suicide

Should euthanasia and assisted suicide be the task of physicians? Is it unethical for physicians to perform these procedures at the request of their patients in countries where they are legally permitted? How can medical professionals reconcile patient autonomy with professional responsibility in end-of-life care? Continued advancements in medical technology and lifeprolonging treatments have added a new dimension to debates about...

Commentary on “Teaching Medical Educators How to Teach Communication Skills: More than a Decade of Experience”

The article by Spagnoletti and colleagues in this issue of the Southern Medical Journal makes a strong argument for the benefits of faculty development in how to help medical trainees build and refine clinical communication...

Commentary on “Importance of Interdisciplinary Medical Education: A Frontline Perspective”

In this issue of the Southern Medical Journal, Aman Pandey, a medical student under the mentorship of Dr Jennifer Jackson, presents a perspective on the importance of interdisciplinary medical education preparatory to the responsibility for clinical care of patients.1 I could not agree with Pandey more. In fact, presenting interprofessional and multidisciplinary clinical education concepts is the mission of the Southern Medical Journal....

Improving Underrepresented Minority in Medicine Representation in Medical School

Objectives: Despite the efforts of various leading organizations in medical education, representation of black students in US medical schools has declined since the mid-1990s. The Florida State University College of Medicine (FSUCOM) has undertaken efforts to increase black and other underrepresented minority in medicine (URMM) representation in medical school through the Bridge to Clinical Medicine Program. This program is described and...

Engagement in an Online Cultural Competency Training

Objectives: Engagement with online cultural competency training has not been well studied. We examined knowledge, attitudes, and skills differences among medical students, physicians, and other professionals in an online cultural competency education program. Methods: A total of 1745 participants completed up to four online modules aimed at exploring stereotype, bias, diet, and religion among African American patients with hypertension. We...

Importance of Interdisciplinary Medical Education: A Frontline Perspective

What do you get when a physician, nurse, social worker, and physical therapist walk into a patient’s room? No, this is not the start of some joke, but rather just a regular day at the hospital. I often think about one of my first trauma call nights as a student. Everyone was hanging around, the wonderful aroma of coffee drifted out from the break room and into the resuscitation bay, and the clock struck...

Video Decision Aids in End-of-Life Care: Is There a Role with Older Adult Patients?

To the Editor: Advance care planning (ACP) is a process that enables patients to make decisions about their future endof-life (EOL) care and provide directions to healthcare providers (HCPs) when a person is not in a position to communicate his or her own wishes. For the older adult with multiple comorbidities and cognitive impairments, understanding complex medical treatment and its likely impact on morbidity and mortality can...

Awareness and Knowledge Among Internal Medicine Resident Trainees for Dose Adjustment of Analgesics and Neuropsychotropic Medications in CKD

Objectives: Errors in drug dosing lead to poor patient outcomes and are common in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Because the majority of patients with CKD are being treated by physicians specializing in internal medicine, we studied the awareness and knowledge that internal medicine resident trainees (IMRTs) have regarding the correct dosage of commonly used analgesic and neuropsychotropic medications for patients with...

Commentary on “Awareness and Knowledge Among Internal Medicine Resident Trainees for Dose Adjustment of Analgesics and Neuropsychotropic Medications in CKD”

Research highlights that there is a need to reinforce nephrology-specific education in medical trainees.1 Similar to many internal medicine subspecialties, nephrology continues to evolve with respect to the treatment and management of complex patients—in this case, those who have reduced renal function and chronic kidney disease (CKD)....

Assessing Correlation of Residency Applicants’ Interview Dates With Likelihood of Matching

The timing of an interview in relation to the recruitment season does not appear to have an effect on the likelihood of an applicant matching into a particular program among 11...