Religious Characteristics of Physicians Who Care for Underserved Populations or Work in Religiously Oriented Practices

Objectives: This study examined the relation between physicians’ religious characteristics and working for medically underserved populations or in religiously oriented practices. Methods: Secondary data analysis of 2009–2010 national survey of 896 primary care physicians (PCPs) and 312 psychiatrists. Predictors included physicians’ religious characteristics. Results: Adjusted response rates among eligible physicians were 63% (896 of...

Commentary on “Religious Characteristics of Physicians Who Care for Underserved Populations or Work in Religiously Oriented Practices”

In recent years, the common understanding has been that the United States is becoming increasingly less religious. Certainly as far as religious observance and active participation in organized faith communities is concerned, this is demonstrably the case. Paradoxically, however, attention to the role of religion and spirituality in how patients and caregivers cope with illness and make decisions about their care has increased. The rise of...

How Much Time Do Residents Spend on Inpatient Clinical Computing?

Objective: To evaluate the time that residents spend on clinical computing. Methods: Our electronic health record system was used to record clinical computing time. Residents were unaware that we were tracking their time. Prior studies have reported computing times by watching the users. We evaluated residents in internal medicine, general surgery, and emergency medicine. The postgraduate year 1 (PGY1) and PGY3 residents were evaluated in...

Hospitalist Infectious Disease Service in Academic Medical Centers: A Win-Win for Hospitalists and Fellows

In the last decade, inpatient care has changed dramatically at academic centers nationwide. In part this has been driven by resident work-hour restrictions, which have forced most teaching hospitals to develop and expand hospitalist services.1,2 Our institution initiated an inpatient hospitalist team, called the Collaborative Inpatient Medical Service, in 2000. The service has grown significantly since its inception, and in 2014 included 40...

Commentary on “Patient Beliefs and Preferences Regarding Surrogate Decision Makers”

In this issue of the Southern Medical Journal, Hunter and Walters report an ongoing problem with surrogate decision making in the absence of legally sufficient advance directives: the default choice as defined by state law may not be the patient’s preferred surrogate.1 This mismatch is particularly important because so few hospitalized patients (in this case, fewer than one-third) complete advance directives. Although the nature and weight of...

Patient Beliefs and Preferences Regarding Surrogate Decision Makers

Objectives: Many patients lose the capacity to make medical decisions because of severe illness or the effects of sedation or anesthesia. Most states in the United States designate the next of kin (NOK) as a default surrogate decision maker (SDM), but this may not always reflect patient preferences. Our objective was to determine how frequently the default SDM matched the patient’s preferred SDM, and whether patients knew who would serve as...

Team-Based Learning Activities for First-Year Medical Students: Perception of the Learners

Objectives: Team-based learning (TBL) is an active learning strategy that is used increasingly in medical education to promote critical thinking, knowledge application, teamwork, and collaboration. The aim of this study was to assess the students’ perspective on the utility of TBL compared with traditional lectures. Methods: We used a validated TBL student assessment instrument comprising three subscales studying accountability, preference...

Effect of the Adoption of a Comprehensive Electronic Health Record on Graduate Medical Education: Perceptions of Faculty and Trainees

Objectives: Health systems are adopting electronic health records (EHRs). There are few studies on the effects of EHR implementation on graduate medical education. The authors sought to longitudinally assess perceptions of the impact of EHRs on graduate medical education during implementation and 2 years after implementation. Methods: A survey was distributed to faculty and trainees during the first year (2013) of adoption of the EHR system....

Are All Teaching Activities Valued the Same? Their Relative Worth Is in the Eye of the Beholder

Objectives: The pressures for generating revenue from clinical activities dissuade clinician-educators from teaching; taking the steps to develop an educational value system is a way to recognize and perhaps support education. We compared the perceived educational value of diverse pedagogical activities during clinical training from students, residents, and faculty in medical and surgical specialties. Methods: Between 2016 and 2017, a survey...

Commentary on “Are All Teaching Activities Valued the Same? Their Relative Worth Is in the Eye of the Beholder”

Teaching brings enjoyment to many. This gratification comes from the inherent rewards it brings most of us involved in this career. Helping students learn, observing their growth, and making a difference in their development are rewarding elements of an academic teaching career. Interacting with medical students and housestaff fosters our sense of intellectual stimulation....

Moving Career Development Upstream: Evaluation of a Course for Internal Medicine Trainees Contemplating Career Pathways in Academic Medicine

Objectives: Despite training in academic medical centers, many residents and fellows lack an understanding of the different career paths in academic medicine. Without this fundamental knowledge, choosing an academic career pathway and transitioning to junior faculty is challenging. We started the Pathways in Academic Medicine course (“Pathways”) to introduce residents and fellows to the wide array of academic career pathways and to expose...

Improving Medical Students’ Perceptions of Older Adults by Engaging Older Military Veterans in Recreational Activities

To the Editor: The aging of the US population has led to a shortage of physicians in geriatrics to care for the 30% of older adults who should be seen by a geriatrician.1 To compound this deficit, few physicians are choosing to specialize in this...

Public CPR and AED Knowledge: An Opportunity for Educational Outreach in South Carolina

Objectives: Sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) remains a significant cause of morbidity and mortality, and the key to increased survival is emergent bystander intervention. A growing body of evidence has shown that timely bystander-initiated cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and defibrillation are significantly correlated with an increased likelihood of survival. Despite these demonstrated benefits, bystanders perform these interventions in less than...

Resident Perceptions of Competency and Comfort Before and After Telemedicine-ICU Implementation

Objectives: The purpose of this study was to examine the impact telemedicine in the intensive care unit (ICU) has on the competency, satisfaction, and education of resident physicians. Methods: Telemedicine in the ICU was implemented in 2014 at a community hospital with 24 family medicine residents. Comfort with the performance of various common procedures; management of major medical diseases in the ICU; and level of comfort, attitudes, and...

Commentary on “Resident Perceptions of Competency and Comfort Before and After Telemedicine-ICU Implementation”

Telemedicine in the intensive care unit (ICU) was first described by Grundy and colleagues in the 1980s.1 Using two-way audiovisual technology, centers that house practitioners (intensivists, advance practice providers, and critical care nurses) are connected to hospitals serving critically ill...

On “Improving Medical Students’ Perceptions of Older Adults by Engaging Older Military Veterans in Recreational Activities”

To the Editor: I would like to commend Mr Jue and his medical student colleagues at the University of Miami School of Medicine, who, along with their faculty mentor, Dr van Zullen, have addressed the important issue of medical student comfort with older adult patients....

And Now, Please Sign on the Dotted Line: Teaching Residents About Professional Life After Residency

Objectives: Despite possible long-term repercussions, few training programs teach their residents about the business of medicine. In particular, certain contractual issues can adversely affect a young physician’s career mobility. Methods: We designed a business-of-medicine curriculum and used a survey to determine whether the curriculum satisfied attendees’ perceived knowledge gaps about the topics covered in the course, which included...

Commentary on “At the Vatican, Physicians Debate Euthanasia and Assisted Suicide”

We are pleased to publish in this issue of the Southern Medical Journal an editorial by Dr Ramin W. Parsa-Parsi of Germany regarding a conference in Europe on the topics of euthanasia and assisted suicide.1 This conference was held at the Vatican under the auspices of the World Medical Association (WMA) and other institutions, and although focused on medical practices in Europe, the discussions have clear global...

Assessing Mentorship Experiences of Faculty at a Military Academic Center: Challenge and Opportunity

Objectives: Mentor relationships are a key component of professional development within academic medicine. To date, there are no investigations into the prevalence and effects of mentor relationships within military academic medicine. This quality improvement initiative aimed to establish the prevalence and effects of mentorship, including whether sex differences exist among faculty at a military academic center, the San Antonio Uniformed...

Commentary on “And Now, Please Sign on the Dotted Line: Teaching Residents About Professional Life After Residency”

When is a resident’s training complete? When her test scores prove she has retained a set of medical knowledge? When she attains behavioral milestones in communication skills, interprofessional teamwork, and quality improvement? When she embraces diversity, listens for unspoken pain, and satisfies the standards set by Hippocrates and HIPPA (Health Insurance Portability and Accountability...