Commentary on “Wellness Programs in an Academic Practice: Lessons Learned”

We commend the authors of the Perspective entitled “Wellness Programs in an Academic Practice: Lessons Learned,” for highlighting the importance of resident wellness and for developing positive efforts to promote resilience in their resident cadre.1 The present climate in graduate medical education is one of striving to appreciate the...

Wellness Programs in an Academic Practice: Lessons Learned

The development of wellness programs in many groups is increasingly common as institutions work to address the issue of burnout and employee performance. Academic programs face a unique challenge establishing wellness plans because of the varied professional roles of individuals working together in a team model. The individuals in...

Statewide Regional Campus Development: Academic Medicine’s Response to US Physician Shortages

Based on data from the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC), the United States will experience a shortage of up to 122,000 physicians by 2032, affecting patient care across the nation.1 In 2006, the AAMC recommended a 30% increase in US medical school enrollment to address the national physician...

Editor’s Response

I appreciate the Letter to the Editor by Thangathurai and colleagues, which examines the issue of physician spirituality as applied to end of life and critical care of patients. More than 50 years ago, as medical students and resident physicians, we were forbidden to even explore the patient’s spirituality....

Spirituality of Physicians

To the Editor: We evaluated the spirituality of caretakers, mainly physicians, in regard to its effect on the care of critically ill patients, terminally ill cancer patients, and older adult patients with comorbidities involving multiorgan dysfunctions. Spiritual issues are common in patients’ final days of life. Historically, spiritual care...

Commentary on “How Postbaccalaureate Career Changer and Traditional Medical Students Differ Academically”

The article by Baill and colleagues in this issue of the Southern Medical Journal1 addresses a moderately important point in medical education, will so-called career changers (CCs) do poorly in medical school? For example, should a medical school seriously consider giving a spot to an applicant who studied liberal...

How Postbaccalaureate Career Changer and Traditional Medical Students Differ Academically

Objective: This retrospective descriptive study compared the academic performance of postbaccalaureate career changer students with that of traditional students during the classroom-based, science-dominated early years of medical school. Earlier studies documented the eventual success of nontraditional medical students, although we found little information specific to the medical school performance...

Curriculum Enrichment Across the Medical Education Continuum Using e-Delphi and the Community Priority Index

Objective: To describe the use of the e-Delphi combined with the Community Priority Index (CPI) to support medical curriculum enrichment.Methods: This mixed-methods study was conducted from December 2017 to May 2018 at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston, Texas. First, a nominal group identified a topical list. Second, to...

CME Article: A More Directive Living Will for Older Adult Patients with End-Stage Medical Conditions?

Objectives: Many older adult patients want to be treated aggressively for reversible conditions, even when their current quality of life is limited; however, most standard living wills focus on the very end of life and provide little guidance to acute care providers (ACPs) should their older adult patient be...

Teaching Medical Students in the Rural Setting Long Term: Physicians’ Attitudes and Perceptions

Objectives: The University of Alabama School of Medicine Tuscaloosa Regional Campus conducted a 2-month block in rural family practice, but committed to expanding to an 8-month longitudinal rural curriculum. We wanted to explore how rural physicians feel about teaching students in a prolonged rural preceptorship.Methods: We brainstormed with colleagues,...

Implementation of Case Conferences to Improve Interprofessional Collaboration in Resident Continuity Clinic

Objectives: Residents must be trained in skills for interprofessional collaboration and team-based care in the outpatient setting, and successful models are needed to achieve this aim. A longitudinal curriculum was developed to enhance residents’ knowledge of interprofessional team members’ roles, residents’ attitudes toward team-based care, and patient referrals to...

Moral Injury or Burnout?

Burnout among healthcare providers is a growing problem, leading to the early retirement of otherwise qualified professionals and suboptimal medical care. Rates of physician burnout in the United States are estimated to exceed 50%, increasing the cost of medical care through high turnover and decreased quality of patient...

Moral Controversy and Working with Colleagues with a Shared Ethical/Moral Outlook: A National Survey of US Primary Care Physicians

Commentary on “Moral Controversy and Working with Colleagues with a Shared Ethical/Moral Outlook: A National Survey of US Primary Care Physicians”

The finding that in the midst of moral conflict, physicians who are more religious or with a high sense of calling may prefer to work most closely with colleagues who share similar ethical and moral perspectives is not entirely surprising, as detailed in the article by Choi and colleagues...

CME Article: Moral Controversy and Working with Colleagues with a Shared Ethical/Moral Outlook: A National Survey of US Primary Care Physicians

Objectives: This study assesses physicians’ attitudes on the importance of working with colleagues who share the same ethical or moral outlook regarding morally controversial healthcare practices and examines the association of physicians’ religious and spiritual characteristics with these attitudes.Methods: We conducted a secondary data analysis of a 2009 national...

Commentary on “What Defines an Honors Student? Survey of Pediatric and Internal Medicine Faculty Perspectives”

In “What Defines an Honors Student? Survey of Pediatric and Internal Medicine Faculty Perspectives,” in this issue of the Southern Medical Journal, Schmit and colleagues seek to explicate how attendings think.1 How do these evaluators recognize excellence (honors) for a third-year medical student...

What Defines an Honors Student? Survey of Pediatric and Internal Medicine Faculty Perspectives

Objective: Although considerable emphasis is placed on the attainment of honors in core medical school clerkships, little is known about what student characteristics are used by attending physicians to earn this designation. The purpose of this study was to evaluate what values and characteristics that attending physicians consider important...

The Costs of Applying to Residency: One Institution’s Efforts to Increase Transparency

Objectives: To provide students at our own institution with more accurate and granular data regarding the costs associated with applying for residency.Methods: We created an electronic survey with >28 different fields delineating the costs associated with applying for residency. Demographic data, costs broken down by type of expenditure, and...

CME Article: Workplace Violence: Experiences of Internal Medicine Trainees at an Academic Medical Center

Objectives: Healthcare professionals are at higher risk for workplace violence (WPV) than workers in other sectors. This elevated risk exists despite the vast underreporting of WPV in the medical setting. The challenge of responding to this risk is compounded by limited empirical research on medical training environments. Understanding trainees’...

OPEN: Practical Considerations for the Academic Physician Moving to a New State

Moving from one state to another for a new position or opportunity is a common event for academic physicians. Although moving can be personally and professionally disruptive for everyone, it can be particularly challenging for academic physicians. From practical considerations such as applying for a new state medical license...