Specialties - Southern Medical Association

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Abstract | March 2, 2021

Reduction in Donor Site Morbidity: Full-Thickness Skin Columns vs. Split-Thickness Skin Grafts

Split-thickness skin grafts (STSGs) are the mainstay of treatment for wounds too large to heal via linear closure. However, they fail to adequately reproduce basic functions of skin such as temperature regulation, pliability, uniform texture and color, and lubrication. Additionally, STSG donor sites subject patients to new, open wounds that can serve as a source of significant pain and result in scarring.

Posted in: Burn Medicine55

Abstract | March 2, 2021

Cerebral Edema from Electrocution

Severe electrical burns are uncommon. They usually occur on the upper extremities with exit sites on the lower extremities. We present a case of a patient with an electrical burn to the posterior scalp that exited the buttock and ultimately lead to cerebral edema, herniation and death.

Posted in: Burn Medicine55

Abstract | March 2, 2021

If Seeing Was Believing – A Retrospective Review of Potential Reduced Treatment with a Novel Burn Wound Assessment Device

Burn care (BC) remains a highly specialized and resource intensive specialty with only 2% of hospitals featuring a burn center and less than 1% of graduating general surgery and plastic surgery residents pursing a burn fellowship each year. Access to specialized care is further complicated by burn wound assessment (BWA) which is commonly performed visually without adjunctive devices.

Posted in: Burn Medicine55

Abstract | March 2, 2021

Application of Topical Exogenous Nutrient and Saline Supplementation to Improve Skin Graft Survival: From the Lab to the Operating Room

Skin grafts are one of the most common procedures performed by surgeons. Although graft take rates are generally thought of as very high, this number is difficult to ascertain as graft take largely relies on the recipient wound bed. In cases where the wound bed is poorly vascularized, as in the case of exposed fascia, tendon, or bone, skin grafting is often delayed until the wound bed improves.

Posted in: Burn Medicine55

Abstract | March 2, 2021

Resourceful Surgical Planning for Coverage of Large Burns: Optimizing Cultured Epithelial Autografts (CEAs) Outcomes by Combining with a Modified MEEK Procedure

Our center previously reported a modified MEEK technique that provides reliable skin transfer using a specific adhesive called “The Rule of Sevens”.1 This innovative approach has become a consistent part of our practice and we have experienced good outcomes as a result.

Posted in: Burn Medicine55

Abstract | March 2, 2021

Autologous Epidermal Skin Cell Suspension: A Cost-Effective Treatment for Burns >20% TBSA in a County Hospital with Limited Resources

With an estimated cost of eight billion dollars per year, burn injury care places a significant financial burden on our healthcare system both at the national and local levels. Of the most vulnerable, community health centers (CHCs) intended to serve high need areas and underserved populations face a constant strain in a resource-poor environment.

Posted in: Burn Medicine55

Abstract | March 2, 2021

Plantar Foot Burns Among Diabetic Adults During Beach Season

Diabetic neuropathy damages nerves leading to numbness and loss of sensation in feet, rendering those patients more susceptible to burns. A 5 year chart review revealed that our burn center manages 9-14 adult plantar foot burns annually. During Spring and Summer, temperatures rise and more people go to the beach and pool.

Posted in: Burn Medicine55

Abstract | March 2, 2021

Benefits of LCSW Utilization in an Adult Burn Clinic: More Than Just Checking the Box

Posted in: Burn Medicine55

Abstract | March 2, 2021

Evaluation of Topical Off-The-Shelf (OTS) Therapies to Improve Burn Wound Healing During Prolonged Field Care

Surgical debridement of injured service members is only permitted once the combat casualty arrives at a Role 4 level of care. While awaiting definitive treatment, wounds are at risk of infection and delayed healing.

Posted in: Burn Medicine55

Abstract | March 2, 2021

Quality Improvement Analyst in the Burn Unit

The role of the Quality Improvement Analyst (QIA) is a role that is not widely known and unique to one organization. The role began out of a desire to increase frontline knowledge of quality improvement, serve as unit quality and safety champion, disseminate best practices, and lead quality improvement initiatives on the unit. The QIA serves as the bridge between leadership and clinical staffing to connect quality focus and improvement.

Posted in: Burn Medicine55

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