Case Report

Amebiasis Presenting as Acute Appendicitis

Authors: Javier E. Andrade, MD, Raul Mederos, MD, Haidy Rivero, MD, Morgan A. Sendzischew, BA, Mauela Soaita,MD, Morton J. Robinson, MD, Harry Sendzischew, MD, Payman Danielpour, MD

Abstract

Amebiasis presenting as acute appendicitis is extremely rare. The case of a 38-year-old Hispanic man who presented to the hospital with symptoms and signs suggestive of acute appendicitis is reported. He underwent laparoscopic appendectomy and the pathologic examination of the appendix revealed multiple trophozoites of Entamoeba histolytica. The patient was treated postoperatively with metronidazole for amebiasis, and follow-up stool studies showed no sign of residual infection. The patient has remained asymptomatic.


Key Points


* Appendicitis of amebic origin is considered a rare; intestinal manifestation of invasive amebiasis, and also a rare cause of acute appendicitis.


* The preoperative diagnosis of amebic appendicitis is almost impossible because there are no clinical features or diagnostic laboratory tests, other than stool examination, that differentiates amebic from bacterial appendicitis.


* The clinical picture presented in this report represents a typical case of amebic appendicitis with a good outcome after surgical resection and treatment with metronidazole.

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