Editorial

Comment on “Propofol Versus Dexmedetomidine for Procedural Sedation in a Pediatric Population”

Authors: Steven T. Baldwin, MD

Abstract

The utilization and standards of practice for pediatric deep sedation have undergone multiple changes during the last 20 to 30 years. The key drivers of change include growth in
imaging and surgical procedures along with desires to better alleviate patient stress related to anxiety or pain, improve procedural performance of providers, enhance access to sedation and analgesia for care provided outside operating rooms, and enhance safety and cost-effectiveness of clinical care.

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References

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