Primary Article

Comparison of Hypertension Prevalence and Control in 5,237 Rural and Urban Alabama Residents

Authors: STEPHEN N. BARTON MD, PhD, MAPA, DAVID W. COOMBS PhD, MPH, HOWARD L. MILLER PhD, MPH, GLEN H. HUGHES PhD, GARY CUTTER PhD

Abstract

ABSTRACT: Selected urban and rural Alabama populations were compared by age, sex, and race on the prevalence of hypertension and uncontrolled hypertension and the percentage of treated hypertensives with controlled blood pressure. We found the following results: (1) Rural women had a significantly higher prevalence of hypertension than urban women. (2) The prevalence of uncontrolled hypertension was significantly higher for urban white men than for their rural counterparts. (3) The prevalence of uncontrolled hypertension was significantly higher for rural black women aged 30 to 39 than for the same age group of urban black women. (4) Rural dwellers generally had much better blood pressure control than urban, though this was not manifested evenly across groups. Statistically significant differences were found for white men and women of all ages combined and in three of four age groups. Reasons for the rural-urban differences are unclear, but the rural area surveyed was served by nurse practitioner clinics that strongly emphasized patient education.

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References