Case Report

Complete Currarino Triad Presenting with Diarrhea in a 7-Month-Old Girl

Authors: William B. Horton, BS, Michael A. Steiner, MD, Majid A. Khan, MD

Abstract

The Currarino triad is a complex genetic disorder characterized by multiple caudal anomalies. Currarino et al first described this syndrome in 1981 as a sacral bony defect, presacral mass, and an anorectal malformation. Patients with this disorder usually present with constipation and characteristic radiological findings. Early diagnosis is vital for improving patient prognosis and quality of life. We report a case of complete Currarino triad in a 7-month-old girl with an unusual presentation of diarrhea, who was later found to have an imperforate anus with rectoperianal fistula, a presacral lipomyelomeningocele, and sacral hypoplasia.


Key Points


* The Currarino triad is a complex genetic disorder characterized by a sacral bony defect, presacral mass, and an anorectal malformation.


* Proper recognition of these findings by the radiologist may help lead to an early diagnosis and improve patient prognosis and quality of life.


* Pelvic and spinal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are mandatory for the evaluation of the presacral mass and to detect a probable associated intraspinal anomaly.


* We suggest that first-degree relatives of Currarino triad patients should be offered a pelvic radiograph as a relatively inexpensive screening test.

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