Primary Article

Parental Knowledge About Common Respiratory Infections and Antibiotic Therapy in Children

Authors: C APRIL COLLETT MD, DIANE E. PAPPAS MD,JD, BRENT A. EVANS MS, GREGORY F. HAYDEN MD

Abstract

Abstract Background. Widespread antibiotic use has fostered the emergence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria. Parental expectations have been cited as one reason for physicians to overprescribe antibiotics. The objective of this study was to determine parental knowledge about antibiotics and their use for common respiratory tract infections. Methods. A survey was administered to 100 adults at a rural pediatric office. Results. Many respondents had misconceptions about the etiology of common respiratory tract infections and the effects of antibiotic therapy. Only 54% knew that a virus is the usual cause of the common cold, and 33% thought that a virus causes strep throat. Almost half (46%) believed that antibiotics kill viruses, while 17% were not sure whether antibiotics kill viruses. Most respondents (60%) had never heard about antibiotic resistance. Conclusion. Parental knowledge about common respiratory tract infections and about antibiotic therapy is often lacking. Improved parent education may alter parents' expectations concerning antibiotic therapy for their ill children.

This content is limited to qualifying members.

Existing members, please login first.

If you have an existing account please login now to access this article or view your purchase options.

Purchase only this article ($15)

Create a free account, then purchase this article to download or access it online for 24 hours.

Purchase an SMJ online subscription ($75)

Create a free account, then purchase a subscription to get complete access to all articles for a full year.

Purchase a membership plan (fees vary)

Premium members can access all articles plus recieve many more benefits. View all membership plans and benefit packages.

References