Acknowledgment

Patient's Page

Authors: Lindy Russell, BA, Melissa Bright, BA

Abstract

Osteoporosis, meaning “porous bones,” is a silent disease.1 Though not yet fully understood, osteoporosis is thought to be the result of a process called “remodeling,” or “bone turnover.” In the course of bone turnover, your bones are constantly being rebuilt, so to speak. Just like skin cells and taste buds, old bones are broken down while new bones are being built. From birth to around age 35, our bodies build bone, because more bone is being formed than is being broken down. Between the ages of 25 and 35 are the peak years for “bone building;” after 35, your body is not as easily able to restore the bone that is being lost, so your bone mass begins to decrease.2 Maintaining proper nutrition during your “peak years” is key, because the more bone mass you accumulate at this stage, the better your body will be able to handle losing bone mass later.2

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References

1.National Osteoporosis Foundation. Fast Facts on Osteoporosis [NOF Web site]. Available at: http://www.nof.org/osteoporosis/diseasefacts.htm. Accessed July 21, 2008.
 
2.Mayo Clinic Staff. Osteoporosis [Mayo Clinic Web site]. December 13, 2007. Available at: http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/osteoporosis/DS00128. Accessed July 21, 2008.
 
3.Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Nutrition for Everyone [CDC Web site]. May 22, 2007. Available at: http://www.cdc.gov/nccdphp/dnpa/nutrition/nutrition_for_everyone/bonehealth/index.htm. Accessed July 21, 2008.
 
4.National Osteoporosis Foundation. Osteoporosis Medications [NOF Web site]. Available at: http://www.nof.org/patientinfo/medications.htm. Accessed July 21, 2008.
 
5.Mayo Clinic Staff. Calcium Supplements: Which Type of Calcium is Best? [Mayo Clinic Web site]. November 21, 2006. Available at: http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/calcium-supplements/AN00964. Accessed July 21, 2008.
 
6.International Osteoporosis Foundation. Facts and Statistics [IOF Web site]. Available at: http://www.iofbonehealth.org/facts-and-statistics.html. Accessed July 24, 2008.
 
7.National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases. Osteoporosis [NIAMS Web site]. December 2007. Available at: http://www.niams.nih.gov/Health_Info/Bone/Osteoporosis/default.asp. Accessed July 22, 2008.
 
8.National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases. One is Enough: A Guide to Preventing Future Fractures [NIAMS Web site]. June 2008. Available at: http://www.niams.nih.gov/Health_Info/Bone/Osteoporosis/Fracture/default.asp. Accessed July 21, 2008.
 
9.Office of Dietary Supplements. Dietary Supplement Fact Sheet: Calcium. [NIH Web site]. Available at: http://ods.od.nih.gov/factsheets/calcium.asp. Accessed August 4, 2008.