Primary Article

Relationship Between Spray Adhesives and Congenital Malformations

Authors: STANLEY L. SILBERG PhD, DONALD R. RANSOM MPH, JO ANN LYON MPH, PAUL S. ANDERSON JR. PhD.

Abstract

Evidence from clinical impressions and laboratory slides that spray adhesive products could have a potentially dangerous mutagenic or teratogenic effect was first reported in 1973. However, similar laboratory slides observed by others revealed no significant difference between chromosomal slides of malformed infants and those of normal children in households whose members were exposed to spray adhesives. Because of opposing opinions, a pilot epidemiologic study was initiated to investigate the association between the use of spray adhesives and congenital malformations. All congenital malformations reported on birth certificates from 1971 through 1974 in Oklahoma County, Oklahoma were used. A normal birth was selected as a matching control for each case. Complete and usable questionnaires regarding 112 malformed subjects and 116 controls, including 56 matched controls, were received. There was a statistical association between malformed subjects and household members using spray adhesives. There appears to be sufficient epidemiologic evidence to reopen the controversy with the appeal for further studies.

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References