Primary Article

Tularemia Review of Eight Cases of Tick-borne Infection and the Epidemiology of the Disease in Georgia

Authors: CARLOS E. LOPEZ MD, ARNOLD N. KORNBLATT VMD, R. KEITH SIKES DVM, OTTIS E. HANES MD

Abstract

In the period 1960 to 1979, 177 cases of tularemia occurred in residents of Georgia. A tick bite was the implicated source of exposure in eight cases (4.5%), whereas 91 cases (51.4%) were associated with direct contact with infected rabbits. In Georgia and other southeastern states, the epidemiology of human tularemia infection primarily involves rabbits. However, a diagnosis of tularemia should still be considered in this region in a febrile patient with or without a primary lesion or reported exposure to rabbits. A history of having been bitten by a tick may be the major clue in determining the diagnosis. A primary ulcerative lesion on the legs or in concealed body areas, such as the axillary or intergluteal regions, is commonly the presenting sign in the patient with tick-borne tularemia.

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References