Letter to the Editor

We Need to Stop Failing Our Patients

Authors: Bridget Agboola, BMedSci (Hons)

Abstract

To the Editor: A recently published article highlighted the need for medical schools to create an environment in which minorities can thrive.1 As a black female UK medical student, I read this article and others with interest, but I would like to share my thoughts on how the lack of interest in diversity by medical schools is harming not only medical students but also patients by further widening health inequalities. Diversity efforts should not only be fixed on ensuring a diverse student population or creating a flourishing environment for minorities but also should focus on preparing all students to care for a diverse patient population.

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References

1. Chiavaroli N, Blitz J, Cleland J. When I say…. diversity. Med Educ 2020;54:876–877.
 
2. General Medical Council. Promoting excellence: standards for medical education and training. https://www.gmc-uk.org/-/media/documents/promoting-excellence-standards-for-medical-education-and-training-0715_pdf-61939165.pdf. Accessed November 19, 2020.
 
3. General Medical Council. The state of medical education and practice in the UK: 2019. https://www.gmc-uk.org/-/media/documents/gmcsomep-2019-reference-tables-about-medicalstudents_pdf-81408252.pdf. Accessed November 19, 2020.
 
4. Palmieri J, Kushwaha-Wagner A, Bekele A, et al. Missed diagnosis and the development of acute and late Lyme disease in dark skinned populations of Appalachia. Biomed J Sci Tech Res 2019;21:15782–15787.