Issue - Southern Medical Association

25 Years Ago

The Etiology of “Alcoholic” Polyneuritis

Acknowledgement

BOOKS RECEIVED

Article

Virilizing Tumors

Book Review

X-ray and Radium in Dermatology

Book Review

Swire’s Handbook for the Assistant Nurse

Book Review

Metals and Engineering in Bone and Joint Surgery

Book Review

Clinical Dermatology for Students and Practitioners

Book Review

Diagnostic Anatomy

Book Review

International Textbook of Allergy

Case Report

Obstruction of the Small Bowel Due to Carcinoma of the Ascending Colon

Case Report

The Histopathology of Persistent Cat-Scratch Fever Skin Test

Editorial

THE GENERAL PRACTITIONER AND PSYCHIATRY

Editorial

TETANY DUE TO LACK OF MAGNESIUM

In Memory

In Memoriam Dr. Tom Douglas Spies

Announcement

INSTRUCTIONS TO CONTRIBUTORS

Announcement

Know Your Southern Medical Association

Original Article

The Problem of “Compensation” Neurosis

When, in the compensation case, are the clinical symptoms on the basis of conversion hysteria and when do they represent malingering? This is an important and at times difficult differentiation.

Original Article

Mediolateral Episiotomy

Though the episiotomy is the most common obstetric operation, it is not as simple as it is often thought. The errors of omission or commission often result in complications requiring subsequent operations of repair. A complete knowledge of the anatomic structures involved is essential to adequate repair.

Original Article

Bleeding in Diverticular Disease of the Colon

Bleeding from the rectum due to diverticulosis of the colon is a subject for controversy. The author's experience indicates that such bleeding is associated with malignancy in a high incidence.

Original Article

Fractures of the Femur in Children

In femurs in which the epiphyses have not closed, fractures stimulate growth of bone, a fact which must be taken into consideration if the temptation is to be overzealous in attaining a “perfect” reduction when there may be some overriding.

Original Article

“Cardiac Arrest” – The Role of Anoxia in Twenty-One Cases

The author points out that most instances of so-called cardiac arrest actually represent anoxia, which often may be avoided by proper attention to preoperative details and to adequate management in the operating room.

Original Article

Toxemia of Pregnancy: Its Management and Results Without the Use of Antihypertensive Drugs

The serious complication of toxemia naturally has led to many attempts to alleviate it and to reduce the mortality of both the mother and child. The author is not convinced that much if anything has been gained over the older methods of conservative management.

Original Article

I131-Labelled Triolein in the Differential Diagnosis of Jaundice

At times it may be difficult to decide whether jaundice is due to intrinsic disease of the liver or whether it may be due to pancreatic disease. The authors have shown that radioactive I131 triolein may offer aid under such circumstances.

Original Article

The Depressed Patient

The classification of depression illustrates the causative factors whether from the external environment or of endogenous origin. Prognosis is considered by the author as well as treatment.

Original Article

The Ophthalmologist and Problems of Contact Lenses

Contact lenses have been welcomed by many. Women prefer them for esthetic reasons. They are practical for athletes. Under certain circumstances they give better correction for visual impairments.

Original Article

Pellegrini-Stieda Syndrome: Report of Fourteen Cases Followed from Original Injury

The authors call attention to an unusual syndrome which may follow injury to the knee joint. It does not seem to lead to crippling or inability to work as before.

Original Article

Cryptococcosis of the Central Nervous System: Four Cases Treated with Amphotericin B

This fungal infection of the central nervous system is being found with increasing frequency. About a half of the reported cases have been found since 1951. The antibiotic Amphorericin B holds promise as the best therapeutic agent found to date.

Original Article

Rhinoplasty and the Otolaryngologist

Much more interest is being shown in cosmetic surgery. Technics in rhinoplasty are being advanced as described by the author.

Original Article

The Problem of the Ruptured Intervertebral Disk

Too frequently the symptoms of back pain and sciatica are quickly diagnosed as being due to a protruded intervertebral disk. The author considers in detail the diagnosis before discussing treatment.

Original Article

Polymer Osteosynthesis

The introduction of this method of fixing fractures was greeted with much interest and enthusiasm. As so frequently happens with the new, reservation is needed until adequate clinical trial has established the indications for use as well as the complications which may attend its use.

Original Article

Hyperparathyroidism

Tie diagnosis of hyperparathyroidism is frequently missed, the patient consulting several physicians before the diagnosis is made. This is usually a curable disease if the diagnosis is made early and the hyperfunctioning tissue is removed.

Original Article

One Stage Colectomy, Proctectomy and Ileostomy for Diffuse Ulcerative Colitis

The surgical attack on ulcerative colitis has become more bold in recent years with antibiotics and a better understanding of fluid and electrolyte balance. The author proposes a one stage operation be used when the indications for surgery are present.

Original Article

Motivational Aspects of Suicide in Patients During and After Psychiatric Treatment

In recent years much study has been given to the psychiatric aspects of suicide. The minority of suicides have had the advantages of psychiatric consultation and care. This study is a key one in its evaluation of suicidal patients who had psychiatric management, and thereby provides valuable information related to…

Original Article

Appendectomy Incidental to Cesarean Section, Postpartum Sterilization, or Ectopic Pregnancy

Most obstetricians and surgeons have been loathe to do an appendectomy incidental to obstetric abdominal surgery. Therefore the authors planned the study reported here. No increased morbidity was involved in doing the appendectomy and there was no mortality.

Original Article

The Complete Examination of Our Gynecologic Patients

Southern Medical News

Southern Medical News