Issue - Southern Medical Association

Review Article

Can In-Hospital Urinary Catheterization Rates Be Reduced with Benefits Outweighing the Risks?

Urinary catheterization has risks and its use should be limited because it is the main cause of healthcare-associated urinary tract infection. Other risks are the potential for urethral injuries and the possibility that the catheter will be left in permanently. Rates of urinary catheterization in internal medicine departments generally range…

Original Article

Surgical Treatment of Lung Cancer in Octogenarians

Background: As the population ages, octogenarians are becoming the fastest growing patient demographic for non–small-cell lung cancer. We examined lobectomies and 30-day outcomes in this group compared with younger patients to gain insight into the optimal treatment for this challenging group. Methods: We analyzed data from the American College of…

Original Article

Patient-Centered Approach to Ensuring Appropriateness of Care Through Blood Management

Background: Concerns have been raised about the safety and efficacy of blood transfusions. Blood products are in demand and a decreasing supply is projected, with resource conservation a global concern. A consultant group determined that the transfusion rate at Mease Countryside Hospital was higher than an average baseline. Methods: A…

Original Article

Clinical Outcomes of a Veterans Affairs Outpatient Antimicrobial Treatment Program

Objectives: The outpatient parenteral antibiotic therapy (OPAT) program of the Portland Veterans Affairs Medical Center (PVAMC), which has a self-administration model, is staffed by visiting nurses from a specialist infusion company. This study evaluates the clinical outcomes of these patients. Methods: This study was a retrospective chart review of 262…

Original Article

Receptivity to Weight Management Interventions Among Hospitalized Obese Patients An Untapped Opportunity

Objectives: Hospitalized obese patients rarely receive counseling about weight loss. Specific patient preferences regarding inpatient weight loss interventions have not been systematically investigated. The objective of the study was to describe the preferences of hospitalized obese patients for weight loss interventions and to identify predictors of receptivity to such offerings….

Original Article

Findings and Patterns on MRI and MR Spectroscopy in Neonates after Therapeutic Hypothermia for Hypoxic Ischemic Encephalopathy Treatment

Objectives: The purpose of this study is to describe the findings and patterns of injury on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) after whole-body hypothermia treatment for neonatal hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy. Methods: A retrospective review of consecutive term neonates treated with whole-body hypothermia was performed. Data recorded…

Letter to the Editor

Digoxin: Time to Reconsider Its Role in Atrial Fibrillation?

To the Editor:Digoxin is one of the oldest drugs available and has been used extensively in heart failure and the control of ventricular rate for atrial fibrillation (AF). The recently published propensity-adjusted analysis of the Atrial Fibrillation Follow-Up Investigation of Rhythm Management (AFFIRM) trial demonstrated that digoxin is associated with…

Invited Commentary

Commentary on “Receptivity to Weight Management Interventions Among Hospitalized Obese Patients An Untapped Opportunity”

Obesity is a rapidly growing problem in the United States. Solutions have been proposed for and trials have been done on both young and old. Although medical schools and outpatient centers have programs designed to evaluate and manage overweight or obese individuals, scant attention is devoted to identifying opportunities for…

Letter to the Editor

Evidence-Based Medicine and Digoxin

To the Editor:Above, Dr Turagam discusses the relevant issue of what should be done when older treatment modalities become “outdated.” The letter examines the use of digoxin as an antiarrhythmic drug to slow the ventricular rate in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF). The author notes that only in rare situations…

Review Article

Primer in Health Information Exchange for the Emergency Physician Benefits and Barriers

For various reasons, patients seek care at different hospitals within a region, resulting in fragmented medical records at the point of care. In the emergency department, this is a particularly important issue because the emergency department provides open access to all patients and requires rapid high-stakes decision making to function…

Invited Commentary

Commentary on “Primer in Health Information Exchange for the Emergency Physician Benefits and Barriers”

Patients seek emergency care for a variety of reasons. Where a health information exchange (HIE) exists, emergency medical providers have access to clinical information that may otherwise represent a void. The general trend toward greater treatment intensity1 in the nation’s emergency departments reinforces the importance of research on the design…

Invited Commentary

Commentary on “Can In-Hospital Urinary Catheterization Rates Be Reduced with Benefits Outweighing the Risks?

Although historical records imply that ancient physicians relieved distended urinary bladders as early as the 1st century BCE, the iconic figure Frederick Foley published his definitive experiences with urinary catheterization in 1937.1 Foley’s publication, reporting innovation by way of a simple latex rubber catheter, ushered in the modern era of…