August 2019, Volume 112 - Issue 8

Prevalence and Predictors of Pulmonary Embolism in Hospitalized Patients with Syncope

Hussam Ammar, MD, Chaand Ohri, MD, Said Hajouli, MD, Shaunak Kulkarni, MD, Eshetu Tefera, MS, Ragai Fouda, PhD, MD, Rukma Govindu, MD

Abstract: Objectives: Approximately one in six patients hospitalized with syncope have pulmonary embolism (PE), according to the PE in Syncope Italian Trial study. Subsequent studies using administrative data have reported a PE prevalence of <3%. The aim of the study was to...

(pp 421-427)

Weight-Bearing Physical Activity Influences the Effect of Vitamin D on Bone Turnover Markers in Patients with Intellectual Disability

Philip B. May, MD, Stephen J. Winters, MD

Abstract: Objectives: Individuals with intellectual disabilities (IDs) are at increased risk for low bone mass and fragility fractures, and those who are nonambulatory may be at even higher risk. Patients with IDs often are vitamin D deficient, but there is little information...

(pp 428-432)

OPEN: Developing and Piloting a Tool to Identify Food Insecurity in Older Adults

Alexandra King, MD, Regina Roofeh, MPH, Christian Nouryan, MA, Meng Zhang, PhD, Maria Torroella Carney, MD

Abstract: Objective: The literature shows that food insecurity (FI) can negatively affect the trajectory of many chronic illnesses. FI can be acutely severe for older adults, but screening for FI is not regularly performed in the hospital setting. Our goal was to develop a tool to...

(pp 433-437)

Noncarbapenems for the Treatment of Urinary Tract Infections Caused by Extended-Spectrum β-Lactamase-Producing Bacteria

C. Whitney White, PharmD, BCPS, Jeffrey A. Kyle, PharmD, BCPS, Crystal M. Deas, PharmD, BCPS, Jacob Campbell, PharmD

Abstract:  Objectives: Urinary tract infections (UTIs) caused by extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)-producing Enterobacteriaceae are resistant to many conventional therapies, including third-generation cephalosporins. Carbapenems are considered first-line agents for ESBL...

(pp 438-443)

Health Behaviors in Rural Appalachia

Aasha I. Hoogland, PhD, Charles E. Hoogland, PhD, Shoshana H. Bardach, PhD, Yelena N. Tarasenko, DrPH, Nancy E. Schoenberg, PhD

Abstract: Objectives: To better understand the disproportionate burdens from cancer, cardiovascular disease, diabetes mellitus, stroke, and other chronic conditions related to energy balance, we studied diet and physical activity patterns in younger and older adults in rural...

(pp 444-449)

What Defines an Honors Student? Survey of Pediatric and Internal Medicine Faculty Perspectives

Erinn O. Schmit, MD, Chang L. Wu, MD, Ryan B. Khodadadi, MD, L. Nicholas Herrera, MD, Winter L. Williams, MD, Carlos A. Estrada, MD, MS

Abstract: Objective: Although considerable emphasis is placed on the attainment of honors in core medical school clerkships, little is known about what student characteristics are used by attending physicians to earn this designation. The purpose of this study was to evaluate what...

(pp 450-454)

Commentary on “What Defines an Honors Student? Survey of Pediatric and Internal Medicine Faculty Perspectives”

Patricia G. McBurney, MD, MSCR

Abstract: In “What Defines an Honors Student? Survey of Pediatric and Internal Medicine Faculty Perspectives,” in this issue of the Southern Medical Journal, Schmit and colleagues seek to explicate how attendings think.1 How do these evaluators recognize excellence (honors) for a...

(pp 455-456)

CME Article: Moral Controversy and Working with Colleagues with a Shared Ethical/Moral Outlook: A National Survey of US Primary Care Physicians

Kwang Jin Choi, MD, Hyo Jung Tak, PhD, Richard Dwyer, MD, Peter Mousa, MD, Nicholas Barreras, MD, Wafa Dawahir, MD, Theodore Christou, MD, John D. Yoon, MD

Abstract: Objectives: This study assesses physicians’ attitudes on the importance of working with colleagues who share the same ethical or moral outlook regarding morally controversial healthcare practices and examines the association of physicians’ religious and spiritual...

(pp 457-461)

Commentary on “Moral Controversy and Working with Colleagues with a Shared Ethical/Moral Outlook: A National Survey of US Primary Care Physicians”

David A. Fleming, MD, MA

Abstract: The finding that in the midst of moral conflict, physicians who are more religious or with a high sense of calling may prefer to work most closely with colleagues who share similar ethical and moral perspectives is not entirely surprising, as detailed in the article by Choi...

(pp 462)