Issue - Southern Medical Association

Invited Commentary

Commentary on “Updated Prevalence and Demographic Characteristics for ALS Cases in Texas, 2009–2011”

One of the most challenging and difficult diagnoses a neurologist can give a patient is that of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). The implications of the diagnosis and the perception that little can be done to stop the relentless progression of the disease often lead to a great deal of uncertainty…

Original Article

Number of General Medicine Hospital Admissions Performed by Internal Medicine Residents Before and After the 2011 Duty-Hour Regulations

Objectives: In July 2011 the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education implemented new resident duty-hour regulations in an effort to improve resident well-being, clinical performance, and patient care. These regulations have the potential, however, to reduce the number of new patient encounters handled by trainees and thereby could be detrimental…

Original Article

Comportment and Communication Patterns among Hospitalist Physicians: Insight Gleaned Through Observation

Objectives: By 2014, there were more than 40,000 hospitalists delivering the majority of inpatient care in US hospitals. No empiric research has characterized hospitalist comportment and communication patterns as they care for patients. Methods: The chiefs of hospital medicine at five different hospitals were asked to identify their best hospitalists….

Invited Commentary

Commentary on “Understanding the Health Needs and Barriers to Seeking Health Care of Veteran Students in the Community”

More than 2.7 million service personnel served in Afghanistan and Iraq in Operation Enduring Freedom (OEF) and Operation Iraqi Freedom (OIF).1 This number exceeds the total number of Union forces during the Civil War. Although these military engagements have occupied much public attention, when viewed through the lens of an…

Invited Commentary

Commentary on “Empathy, Sense of Power, and Personality: Do They Change During Pediatric Residency?”

In this issue of the Southern Medical Journal, Greenberg and colleagues from the Children’s National Medical Center and The George Washington University School of Medicine in Washington, DC, report their findings on a longitudinal survey of pediatric residents with respect to identifying any change in empathy, sense of power, and…

Letter to the Editor

Being Cultured While Culturing

To the Editor: Although blood cultures remain the gold standard for the diagnosis of bloodstream infections, they are plagued by false-positive results. The Infectious Diseases Society of America guidelines recommend that ideally, contamination rates not exceed 3%.1 Unfortunately false-positive rates exceed 6% in several scenarios,1,2 resulting in approximately 1.2 million…

Original Article

Understanding the Health Needs and Barriers to Seeking Health Care of Veteran Students in the Community

Objectives: Access to care at Veterans Affairs facilities may be limited by long wait times; however, additional barriers may prevent US military veterans from seeking help at all. We sought to understand the health needs of veterans in the community to identify possible barriers to health-seeking behavior. Methods: Focus groups…

Original Article

Empathy, Sense of Power, and Personality: Do They Change During Pediatric Residency?

Objectives: Empathy is a critical competency in medicine. Prior studies demonstrate a longitudinal decrease in empathy during residency; however, they have not included pediatric residents. The relations among the expression of empathy, sense of power (ability to influence other’s behavior), and personality traits in residents also have not been addressed….

Original Article

Healthcare Professionals’ Perceptions and Knowledge of the USPSTF Guidelines on Breast Self-Examination

Objectives: In 2009, the US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) published revised guidelines for breast cancer screening, which recommended against teaching breast self-examination (BSE). The objective of this study was to assess providers’ perceptions and knowledge regarding these updated guidelines. Methods: A cross-sectional survey study was administered to 205 attending…

Invited Commentary

Commentary on “Age-Related Macular Degeneration and Coronary Artery Disease in a VA Population”

Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and coronary artery disease (CAD) are common in older adults and share multiple risk factors, but the association between the two diseases is still not well defined.1,2 Both diseases are causes of significant morbidity, with AMD being the leading cause of vision loss in individuals older…

Original Article

Limited Uptake of Planned Intrauterine Devices During the Postpartum Period

Objectives: The primary objective of this study was to determine the percentage of women with a documented plan for postpartum intrauterine device (IUD) insertion who had a device inserted within 8 weeks of delivery. The secondary objective was to determine factors associated with successful initiation of postpartum IUDs as planned….

Invited Commentary

Commentary on “Limited Uptake of Planned Intrauterine Devices During the Postpartum Period”

The most recent report from the National Survey of Family Growth and the National Center for Health Statistics presents disturbing and surprising information regarding intended and unintended pregnancies in the United States.1 The authors report that in 2008, 51% of pregnancies in the United States were unintended. In addition, between…

Original Article

Age-Related Macular Degeneration and Coronary Artery Disease in a VA Population

Objectives: Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of blindness in the United States. Although AMD shares multiple risk factors with coronary artery disease (CAD), the association between AMD and CAD has not been established. The objective of our study was to demonstrate an association between the diagnosis of…

Original Article

Updated Prevalence and Demographic Characteristics for ALS Cases in Texas, 2009–2011

Objectives: Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a rare motor neuron disease with incidence rates ranging from 1 to 2/100,000 person-years. The Texas Department of State Health Services previously conducted surveillance for ALS in three metropolitan areas of Texas. This project provides an update to this research, while expanding its scope…