Issue - Southern Medical Association

Invited Commentary

Commentary on “The Scrub Revolution: From Hospital Uniform to Public Attire”

I n this issue of the Southern Medical Journal, Callahan and Seifi raise concerns about the propriety and potential risks of healthcare personnel wearing ‘‘scrub’’ uniforms outside their intended environments.1 Their concerns are threefold–microbiological, patient perception specific, and regulatory–and are, in my view, absolutely valid. As pointed out by the…

Perspectives

The Scrub Revolution: From Hospital Uniform to Public Attire

Wander into a coffee shop in the heart of a medical center around 3 PM and you will find many people wearing ‘‘scrub’’ uniforms as they order their afternoon pick-me-up. These people may be physicians, nurses, or surgical assistants, but they also could be technicians, receptionists, veterinarians, or even individuals…

Original Article

Contraception Initiation in the Emergency Department: A Pilot Study on Providers’ Knowledge, Attitudes, and Practices

Objectives: Almost half of all pregnancies in the United States are unintended; these pregnancies are associated with adverse outcomes. Many reproductive-age females seek care in the emergency department (ED), are at risk of pregnancy, and are amenable to contraceptive services in this setting. Through a pilot study, we sought to…

Original Article

Comparison of Adenoma Detection Rates in Afro-Caribbeans and Non-Hispanic Whites Undergoing First Screening Colonoscopy

Objectives: The African American population has a higher prevalence of advanced colon adenomas when compared with non-Hispanic whites and Hispanics, but the risk in other black populations has not been evaluated. Although the Afro-Caribbean population is a significant demographic segment in some regions of the United States, the data are…

Perspectives

Transitioning Our Viewpoints: Improving Care in Gender and Sexual Minorities

“Forgive me for being forward, but are you a transindividual?” “Oh my God! How did you know?” She acted surprised by my question, but her smile suggested she was not offended.

Original Article

Observing and Giving Feedback to Novice PGY-1s

Objectives: In this new era of educational milestones and entrustable professional activities, residency programs have recognized the need to directly observe resident performance. In fact, there is little information about how often residents are observed, what procedures they perform early in training, and whether they receive feedback. Previous publications have…

Original Article

Does Carbohydrate Challenge Testing Predict Clinical Response in Small Intestinal Bacterial Overgrowth?

Objectives: Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) is considered a frequent cause of abdominal symptoms in patients with surgically altered intestinal anatomy or dysmotility conditions and is recognized as a contributing factor in the exacerbation of irritable bowel syndrome symptoms. Diagnostic testing can be used to detect the condition. Methods: The…

Invited Commentary

Commentary on “Reflections on the Social Responsibility of a Physician”

A physician’s social responsibility to his or her community and profession does not end at the door to the clinic or hospital. Physicians are subject to much broader accountability than just the clinical setting (which, of course, is important), owing to our education, position in society, judgment, discernment, and problem-solving…

Invited Commentary

Commentary on “Prospective Evaluation of the Clinical Features of Choledocholithiasis: Focus on Abdominal Pain”

Abdominal pain is a commonly encountered problem both in the ambulatory care setting and in emergency medical care. In a telephone survey of 21,128 adults, 4.8% experienced upper abdominal pain at least once during the past 3 months.1 Pain also is the number one complaint observed in emergency medical care….

Original Article

Tobacco Use Patterns in a Southern US HIV Clinic

Objectives: Smoking rates are two to three times higher among people living with HIV and AIDS compared with the general population, but the prevalence of tobacco use among this population in the Charleston, SC region has not been established. To understand cigarette use, previous quit attempts, historic use of cessation…

Acknowledgment

Echocardiography-Defined Pulmonary Hypertension in Multiple Myeloma: Risk Factors and Impact on Outcomes

Objectives: Survival of patients with multiple myeloma (MM) has improved as a result of therapeutic advances. There is evidence that some patients with MM develop pulmonary hypertension (PH). The objective of this study was to identify risk factors of echocardiographic PH and its impact on outcomes of patients with MM….

Original Article

Prospective Evaluation of the Clinical Features of Choledocholithiasis: Focus on Abdominal Pain

Objectives: Although abdominal pain is a cardinal feature of choledocholithiasis, there has been little formal study of the features of pain in this condition. The objective of this study was to prospectively evaluate the clinical, laboratory, and radiological features of common bile duct stones, focusing on the characteristics of abdominal…

Perspectives

Reflections on the Social Responsibility of a Physician

“I am not a role model.’’ This sentiment has been purveyed by many athletes and actors after scandals involving drugs, physical abuse, or any number of other indiscretions brought to the public’s attention by the spotlight of fame. The underlying argument is that public criticism is undeserved in the absence…

Original Article

Discharge Rounds: Implementation of a Targeted Intervention for Improving Patient Throughput on an Inpatient Medical Teaching Service

Objectives: Patient throughput and early discharges are important for decreasing emergency department wait times and creating available beds for new hospital admissions. The educational schedule of internal medicine trainees can interfere with timely discharges, but targeted interventions can help residents meet the hospital’s patient flow needs. Our training program instituted…